Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Legal Risks to Creative Innovation and Research at College: NJ Drops Its Investigation of MIT Students

Eighteen months after winning a hackathon innovation prize for a clever idea of a new online content business model, the MIT undergraduates who created Tidbit are finally free from the legal nightmare attracted by their proof of concept. Earlier this week, the New Jersey Attorney General dropped their investigation of the students, ending a case that hung over these students for a third of their undergraduate education. I'm incredbily relieved for the Tidbit undergrads, though I'm disappointed and upset that they had to face this legal challenge for so long.

In this post, I want to share what we're doing to figure out how to prevent similar problems in the future, or at least to better support other innovative student projects with legal problems. For more about the Tidbit case, you can read Jeremy Rubin's post, an update by the EFF, and a blog post by Ethan Zuckerman. I strongly suggest you read them.

A New Crowd for Old Problems: How You Can Start Impact Investing Locally

Earlier this week I gave a talk at Stanford's Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society, publishers of the Stanford Social Innovation Review, on civic crowdfunding. I was excited to share how my research into crowd-based community finance has evolved, and how Neighborly's launch this summer will make impact investing a local reality for the first time in the US. Here's the talk.

Humanitarian Technology Festival

I came on with Aspiration back in January as the Community Leadership Strategist, to merge the work I've been doing in the humanitarian and disaster response space with Aspiration's practices and team. It's been a *blast* so far, and continues to be.

How Interfaces Demand Obedience

This is a liveblog of a talk by Mushon Zer-Aviv on April 23, 2015 at the MIT Center for Civic Media. This is not a perfect transcript but are notes collaboratively taken by Yu Wang, Dalia Othman, Erhardt Graeff, and Catherine D'Ignazio.

Mushon presenting at Civic

Mushon Zer-Aviv introduces himself as interested in disinformation and ambiguity. He is teaching at Shenkar College and is working with Public Knowledge Workshop on civic engagement and government transparency. As a designer he's been working on these issues for many years and will discuss political design interface through:

  1. Communication cycle
  2. Protocol
  3. Interface for resistance

When we talk about life online, it is distributed, open, social, emancipatory. Online life is repressive, destructive, shallow. All these hopes and concerns when it comes to online life, we meet them through interface. It is at the heart of the debate.

What is interface? Mushon defines interface as "a common boundary or interconnection between systems, equipment, concepts, or human beings." Specifically, the concept of common boundary and interconnection. The idea that the interface is common implies some kind of relationship between all the components without implying a level of control or that one is more important than the other. 

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed