Recent news from the Center for Civic Media | MIT Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Liveblogging #ODR2015: What does it mean to Incorporate ODR into Court Practice and Procedure: A Comparative Approach


I'm here at the #ODR2015 conference at Pace Law School. ODR2015 is the annual meeting of the Online Dispute Resolution Forum, an international assembly of lawyers, mediators, technologists, and others who care about technology and dispute resolution. It is cohosted by the National Center for Technology and Dispute Resolution, where I am a fellow.


This liveblog represents a best-efforts account, not a direct transcript, of the lecture, presentation, and/or panel.

*****

The second session at ODR2015 is a panel titles "What does it mean to Incorporate ODR into Court Practice and Procedure: A Comparative Approach." It's moderated by Dan Weitz, Statewide Alternative Dispute Resolution Coordinator, New York Office of Court Administration. Panel participants include:

Liveblogging #ODR2015: Considering ODR in the Dispute Resolution Paradigm and Its Impact on Lawyers


I'm here at the #ODR2015 conference at Pace Law School. ODR2015 is the annual meeting of the Online Dispute Resolution Forum, an international assembly of lawyers, mediators, technologists, and others who care about technology and dispute resolution. It is cohosted by the National Center for Technology and Dispute Resolution, where I am a fellow.

This liveblog represents a best-efforts account, not a direct transcript, of the lecture, presentation, and/or panel.

******

The opening lecture of ODR2015 is delivered by Richard Susskind, an independent author, speaker, and adviser to law firms, in-house legal departments, judiciaries, and governments around the world. He is President of the Society for Computers and Law, IT Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Chair of the Advisory Board of the Oxford Internet Institute, and Chair of the ODR Advisory Group of the Civil Justice Council.

Legal Risks to Creative Innovation and Research at College: NJ Drops Its Investigation of MIT Students

Eighteen months after winning a hackathon innovation prize for a clever idea of a new online content business model, the MIT undergraduates who created Tidbit are finally free from the legal nightmare attracted by their proof of concept. Earlier this week, the New Jersey Attorney General dropped their investigation of the students, ending a case that hung over these students for a third of their undergraduate education. I'm incredbily relieved for the Tidbit undergrads, though I'm disappointed and upset that they had to face this legal challenge for so long.

In this post, I want to share what we're doing to figure out how to prevent similar problems in the future, or at least to better support other innovative student projects with legal problems. For more about the Tidbit case, you can read Jeremy Rubin's post, an update by the EFF, and a blog post by Ethan Zuckerman. I strongly suggest you read them.

A New Crowd for Old Problems: How You Can Start Impact Investing Locally

Earlier this week I gave a talk at Stanford's Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society, publishers of the Stanford Social Innovation Review, on civic crowdfunding. I was excited to share how my research into crowd-based community finance has evolved, and how Neighborly's launch this summer will make impact investing a local reality for the first time in the US. Here's the talk.

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed