Recent news from the Center for Civic Media | MIT Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Craig Watkins on Innovative Youth Education Programs

MIT Tech TV

S. Craig Watkins joined us for lunch today to talk about learning environments which cultivate critical social vision.

Podcast, "Adapting Journalism to the Web" with Jay Rosen and Ethan Zuckerman

Read a detailed run-down on our blog: civic.mit.edu/blog/mstem/jay-rosens-three-layer-journalism-cake

Co-sponsored by the Center for Civic Media; Comparative Media Studies; Science, Technology, and Society; and the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies

New communications technologies are revolutionizing our experience of news and information. The avalanche of news, gossip, and citizen reporting available on the web is immensely valuable but also often deeply unreliable. How can professional reporters and editors help to assure that quality journalism will be recognized and valued in our brave new digital world?

Interview Highlights: Contextualizing Media Practice with Julio Salgado

The following is a summary of an interview with Julio Salgado regarding a project with the Center for Civic Media at MIT on the role of Media and Technology in Social Movements.

Contextualizing Media Practice

Interview Highlights: Dreamers Adrift and the "I Exist" Collection

The following is a summary of an interview with Julio Salgado regarding a project with the Center for Civic Media at MIT on the role of Media and Technology in Social Movements.

About Julio Salgado and Dreamers Adrift

The Internet Didn't Make Trayvon National News, But It Did Sustain the Story

Updated with industry benchmark petition conversion rates (4/11/12) and illustration by Lyla Duey (8/18/12).

Rough illustration of how the Trayvon story took off

For weeks, the only Trayvon Martin coverage I saw was on Twitter, where every progressive I knew had shared a link to the Change.org petition. Eventually, I saw more media attention around the story. This led me to form a hypothesis that people talking about the story online, and specifically, linking to the Change.org petition, kept the story alive long enough for the national media to pick up on it.

I looked into all of the data I could find, including some provided by Change.org, and found out that my hypothesis was incorrect. But the story of how Trayvon Martin became national news, weeks after his death, is still a revealing portrait of our media.

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The Event

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