natematias | MIT Center for Civic Media

Recent blog posts by natematias

Bot-Based Collective Blocklists in Twitter: The Counterpublic Moderation of a Privately-Owned Networked Public Space

Here at the 16th conference of the Association of Internet Researchers, I attended a talk by Stuart Geiger, who is doing helpful work to theorize the role of block bots in conversation on the Internet. Over the years, Stuart's thinking has been deeply influential to my own approach. I've written about his work twice before, in my Atlantic article about how people work to fix broken systems that aren't theirs to repair. I've also liveblogged a great talk he gave on supporting change from the outside platforms.

Stuart opens by saying that block bots are systems where anti-harassment activists have developed algorithmic software agents to deal with harassment, relatively independently from Twitter. Blockbots involve different kinds of gatekeeping than what we typically think about. It's different from algorithmic gatekeeping (Tufekci), network gatekeeping (Nahon), or filter bubbles (Pariser). How can we make sense of it?

Online Vigilantes, the Wikipedia GamerGate Controversy, Ethics of Bots at AOIR 16

I'm here at the 16th AOIR conference liveblogging a session on ethics. You can see the abstracts and papers here.

To start out Mathias Klang gives a talk about "online vigilantism," On The Internet Nobody Can See Your Cape: The ethics of online vigilantism. What is online vigilantism? Mathias talks about large-scale online responses to the Justine Sacco case, the infamous smiling selfie from Auschwitz, the dentist who shot cecil the lion, the woman who put a cat in a bin in Coventry. Most of these events don't go to court; they are actions that lead us to be annoyed somehow, says Mathias.

Religious Hashtags, Memes, and Apps Online: AOIR 16 Liveblog

This weekend, I'm here at the 16th AOIR conference, blogging panels and talks, as well as talking about my research on ways that users put platforms under pressure.

As a Christian who occasionally writes about intersections between faith and technology, I was delighted to attend the AOIR session on religion and the Internet. Here are my notes.

How Can Online Platforms Prioritize Worker Interests? Steven Dawson on Worker-owned Co-ops

What does it take to create business models that put worker well-being at their center, and what can platform economies learn from that history? How can we turn a lousy job into a better one?

Every Tuesday, Brian Keegan and I are privileged to facilitate the Berkman Cooperation working group, which brings together a Boston-wide conversation among designers, advocates, social scientists, computer scientists, and economists on themes of online cooperation. This week, we welcomed Steven Dawson, a veteran leader in the U.S. co-op movement. Here are my live notes from the conversation.

Steven Dawson is the co-founder of Paraprofessional Healthcare, the largest employee-owned co-op in the U.S. Together with Steven, we had a discussion about peer production and cooperative sharing economies through the lens of the concrete histories and operations of cooperative businesses.