Andrew

Recent blog posts by Andrew

Video: Andrew Lowenthal, "EngageMedia: Video4Change"

EngageMedia is a citizen video sharing platform, as well as a training, network development, software and research project based in Southeast Asia and Australia.

We welcomed Andrew Lowenthal, co-founder and Executive Director, who outlined EngageMedia's work, focusing on the nature of scaling, in particular developing strategic networks and open source software, and their implications and limitations in creating civic media today.

Becky was able to liveblog our Q&A bit of Lowenthal's talk. He also visited the Introduction to Civic Media class (notes, thanks to Rogelio) and the Berkman Center (notes, thanks to Nathan and Sasha).

Video: "Nuke Matters: Effects of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station on Cape Cod Bay"

Cape Cod Bay Watch is dedicated to protecting the species, habitat and health of Cape Cod Bay. The most immediate goal is to educate the public about impacts of Entergy’s Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station—especially its "once-through cooling" system. This system uses over a half-billion gallons of water from the bay every day, killing marine life in the process and dumping the water, heated 32⁰F degrees warmer and polluted with toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, back into the bay. In our opinion, Pilgrim Station does not have a valid permit to operate in this manner and is violating numerous state and federal water quality standards. Despite this, the facility was recently re-licenced to operate for another 20 years.

The power of a spicy chicken sandwich, or, beyond good and evil there's a bug

IMG_0275

If you've spent any time in the American south -- or at the food court in Burlington Mall, ten miles outside Boston -- you've likely gone weak at the knees at the mention of Chick-fil-A. The waffle fries. The sweet tea. And tops, the spicy chicken sandwich.

And you too may be conflicted about 1) Chick-fil-A's homophobia vs. 2) how good that spicy chicken sandwich is. (If this sounds like the Kenny Rogers Roaster episode of Seinfeld, it's not far off.)

So it came as a perversely pleasant surprise that the language associated with one of history's great homophobes, well, this happens:

My Introduction to Making, a Family Story

My mother's father was a machinist.

He had a stocked workshop, and I can't picture him without a blue jumpsuit on, speckled with the light-brown — a sugary scent — of machine oil.

Even as cigars browned his fingers and arthritis froze them, he worked with his hands. His father, an Iowa corn farmer, did too.

Pages