Civic media

Citizen Video and Networked Politics in Southeast Asia: Andrew Lowenthal at the Berkman Center

How are activists in Southeast Asia using a hybrid mix of old and new media for change?

Today's lunch at the Berkman Center is a talk by Andrew Lowenthal, co-founder and executive director of Engage Media, an Asia-Pacific human rights and environmental video organisation who work to develop strategic networks of new citizen video producers. Engage Media also conducts research to look at the use and effect of video for social change. The organisation is 12 people, mostly in Jakarta, but also in Sydney, Melbourne, Singapore, and Manilla. Before founding EngageMedia, Andrew worked with the Tactical Technology Collective as participatory technology lead on projects like NGO in a box and Message in a Box. Andrew was also involved in IndyMedia.

What would W.E.B. Du Bois say about Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies?

Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies: Theories, Evidence, and Strategy

Co-authored by Denise Cheng and Rogelio Alejandro Lopez

Dr. Ernest J. Wilson III, Walter Annenberg Chair in Communication and Dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California.

This will be part 2 of the 3 part series on Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies: Theories, Evidence, and Strategy, that is hosted by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University. The lecture series infers what Du Bois might say about the impact of the digital revolution on communities of color if he were alive today. Today's talk is titled Policy Responses to Digital Inequality: Beyond Economics, for Wednesday November 28, 2012.

Dr. Ernest J. Wilson on Digital Societies and Those at the Bottom

 

What the Transition to a Digital Society Means for Those at the Bottom

Earlier today the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University hosted Dr. Ernest J. Wilson III to give a lecture as part of the Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies: Theories, Evidence, and Strategy series.  The lecture was titled "What the Transition to a Digital Society Means for Those at the Bottom" and began at 4:00pm. 

Vojo community call - Office hours

Last Tuesday, Vojo hosted an "office hours" session where anyone who hadn't taken off for Thanksgiving was welcome to dial in with their questions. The Vojo team met Luís Cotto, a Cantabrigian originally from Hartford, CT.

Fun Fun FOIA

A FOIA, or Freedom of Information Act, request is supposed to be a way for the average citizen to reveal information and documents controlled by the federal government. Anyone can file a FOIA request for pretty much damn near everything, and in Intro to Civic Media we started that process a few weeks ago.

Tweets and the streets with Paolo Gerbaudo


Last Wednesday we had Pablo Gerbaudo presenting his book Tweets and the streets: Social Media and Contemporary Activism at the Center for Civic Media. It was a great opportunity to share ideas, and research, about the use of social networking sites in social mobilizations in the: Arab Spring (in Egypt), Indignados (Spain), Occupy (USA).

Political Tech vs. Civic Tech

The campaign post-mortems are pouring in, unveiling the computer magic behind the Obama campaign. We should probably be thankful that the conversation has evolved from 2004-2008's obsession with social media into a newfound lay interest in data aggregation and empirically valid testing. I'm learning a lot reading these articles.

Email targeting in 2012 political campaigns

An article from The Atlantic about the bearded geeks behind Obama's campaign recently caught the attention of many — as of today, more than 12,000 people have liked it on Facebook and over 3,000 people have tweeted about it. Part of the story's intrigue was the campaign's ability to collect massive amounts of data on voters and volunteers and use that data to target their messages.

This week's blog post will focus on ProPublica's Message Machine and its conclusions about email targeting in the 2012 election campaigns. This blog post is the second post in a series leading up to a final project about mass communication from 2012 election campaigns.

The Story of StoryLine - (888) 803-9856

sandystoryline.com

This post written together with Rachel Falcone.

It’s been nearly 3 weeks since Hurricane Sandy hit the Eastern seaboard and there are still a vast number of people without power, without water, without hot food, and without a home.

Housing is a Human Right (HHR) is a storytelling project led by Michael Premo and Rachel Falcone that has worked for the last five years to connect people around housing, land and the dignity of a place to call home. HHR storytelling follows a tradition of oral history and stories are richly captured and shared in multimedia including audio and photographs. They truly create space for people to share stories of their community and ongoing experiences trying to obtain or maintain a home through exhibitions. They have transformed laundromats and empty stores into storytelling spaces, and create storytelling space on multiple platforms including radio and internet.

Obama’s grassroots calling campaign

How many emails, texts, or phone calls from an organization can you stand until you start automatically labeling the entire operation as spam? For my final project, I will focus on mass communication from organizations with the intention of driving civic action, particularly methods and frequency of communication.

With the 2012 elections, many found themselves the target of mass communication. This blog post will focus on one example of mass communication from a political campaign — Barack Obama’s calling campaign call.barackobama.com, a grassroots campaign to reach voters through their neighbors.

A blog post from April 18 by the campaign described the tool well — “The call tool is already changing what it means to volunteer—allowing anyone, anywhere, to pitch in.”

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