hackathon | MIT Center for Civic Media

Humanitarian Technology Festival

I came on with Aspiration back in January as the Community Leadership Strategist, to merge the work I've been doing in the humanitarian and disaster response space with Aspiration's practices and team. It's been a *blast* so far, and continues to be.

Hacking Institutional Corruption

Midway through the first full day of Hacking iCorruption, the hackathon that Civic co-hosted with Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics this weekend, a participant and Fellow at the Center for Ethics approached Stephanie Dant, Assistant Director of the Center, and gushed, “This is amazing! I asked them”—she gestured at a team of coders—“if they could build it, and they said, ‘Of course.’” The Fellow was agape, in contrast to her coders: “They were deadpan! Like it was nothing!”

Researching Love and Thanks on Wikipedia: CrowdCamp Hackathon Report

"Change favors the prepared," Louis Pasteur once famously noted in a lecture on the nature of scientific observation. The best academic events create moments of highly likely inspiration, and the luckiest ones bring that inspiration into action. That happened for Emily Harburg and me this weekend at CrowdCamp, a two day intensive hackathon on crowdsourcing and social computing research.

Awesome Insights from Hack 4 Diversity

This past weekend I attended CODE2040’s second annual Hack 4 Diversity, a weekend-long hackathon focused on addressing issues of diversity within tech. CODE2040’s summer fellows, along with some amazingly helpful and inspiring members of the broader community, spent the weekend working on projects to promote diversity in a sector that is still comprised largely by white males. Teams explored a broad range of challenges that minorities and women face along the path to entering the professional world of tech.

Hacking Journalism: Rethink how we create, disseminate, and consume media

Hackers at the MIT Media Lab.

By Matt Carroll and Jennifer Lu

It was an audacious hackathon challenge — reinvent mobile news. More than 100 developers, designers, and journalists from Boston, New York, Washington, and London accepted the test, eager to transform the world of journalism. In a weekend.

Fast, wild, and a little loose, people pitched ideas for projects, hoping to attract help in putting a bold idea into reality. Teams formed around ideas, fell apart, came together in different configurations, disintegrated, and finally solidified, some only hours before the presentations.

Projects from the Boston Aaron Swartz Hackathon

Written with Erhardt Graeff, SJ Klein

Intro Talk Ethan led us out by talking about the breadth of Aaron's work, and what it is to be an "effective citizen."

(Second day's talks are written up already on the Civic blog here.)

Projects We Worked On We are deeply appreciative of all of the hard work done at the event, and about the social bonds built in our time together.

Ableson Report TL; DR Distillation and restating the Report to the President on MIT's role (or lack thereof) in the arrest and suicide of Aaron Swartz, such that more people can join in the conversations around the issues specific to MIT.

Patsy Baudoin and Lessig address Boston's Aaron Swartz Hackathon

In cities around the world this weekend, people are participating in an Aaron Swartz Memorial Hackathon. Patsy Baudoin of MIT Libraries and Larry Lessig addressed the Boston-based hackers working from the MIT Media Lab.

Patsy Baudoin (@pbmit)
Patsy begins by saying that today she's not speaking as an MIT librarian, but just as a librarian. She quotes Peter Suber's definition of Open Access: "Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions." The last part is a black hole of academic discussion, which he goes into in his book.

Patsy argues that the ecosystem that we call scholarly communication is unfriendly to open access. The three legged stool of publishers, libraries, and readers, needs to change such that the power flows from readers and publishers and opposed to vice-versa. 

UndocuHack report back

This post written by: Becky Hurwitz (@bxhrz), Pedro Joel (@joelfilms), Rogelio Lopez (@Tochtli_exe) and Celso Mireles (@CelsoM3)

Undocuhack: Hack immigration with Undocutech this weekend

Undocutech is organizing for the National Day of Civic Hacking! Come hack for immigrant rights with us. We’ll be joining #hackforchange in locations all around the country June1-2.

Can’t join on June1-2, but interested in learning how to use media and technology to support immigrant rights? Let us know who you are here: bit.ly/helloundocutech and we’ll include you in meetups and hangouts.

We're keeping this running document of information about how to participate: bit.ly/undocuhack

Hacking the flu emergency at CrisisCamp Boston

ccboston_hackathon

Last month at the Center for Civic Media we held CrisisCamp Boston - an event that is part of the global Crisis Commons organization and sprung out of the Hurricane Hackers group that began life in the Center for Civic Media. There were three motivations for organizing the event: to build on the success of the Sandy group and move forward with those projects, to tackle an immediate and local issue (Boston's flu emergency) and to experiment with a new hackathon / workshop format.

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