Video: Civic Media Session: "Amplified Streets, from Print to Tweets: Social Movement Media Across Platforms" | MIT Center for Civic Media

Video: Civic Media Session: "Amplified Streets, from Print to Tweets: Social Movement Media Across Platforms"

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Social movements have always been productive spaces for the creation and circulation of media texts, tools, and frames for understanding the world. In the past, movement narratives were often told by specialists: filmmakers, writers, radio producers.

These roles still exist, but more recently, the rapid spread of digital literacies allows increased participation in movement media making by everyday participants.

This session brings together social movement media makers and scholars in a conversation about what the transformation of the media ecology means for movements. Under what conditions does media making by a movement's base help strengthen the movement and advance its goals, and when does it produce confusion and a lack of narrative power? How can filmmakers rooted in movements open up their processes to increased participation? What movements today are engaged in innovative cross platform practices?

Jason Pramas is editor/publisher of Open Media Boston - an online metro news weekly with a progressive editorial stance covering the labor and community beats since 2008. A photojournalist by trade, he has been active in movements for democracy and social justice for over a quarter century. He is working on an MFA in Visual Arts at the Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University, and teaches social media in various academic and professional settings.

Steve Meacham is organizing coordinator of City Life/Vida Urbana and has been an organizer for almost forty years, working in areas of housing, labor, community democracy, peace work, and economic conversion. He emphasizes a radical approach that links day-to-day issues to systemic change, that generates new leaders, and that can rapidly expand. His current position at City Life/Vida Urbana has allowed for the full development of this organizing model. It has combined an aggressive day-to-day response to housing displacement with a series of conferences and institutes called the Radical Organizing process.