Petey

Recent blog posts by Petey

Mapping Banned Books in Massachusetts: We Asked Every Public School And Library In The State About Banned Books, And Here's What They Said

TLDR: This post describes the history, process, findings, and caveats of our recently-conducted FOIA campaign of 1,300 public schools and libraries in the state of Massachusetts. You should also check out companion pieces in the Boston Globe, which has an overview of the project, and our research partner MuckRock, which dives more deeply into some of the more interesting results. 

A Brief Guide To User-Generated Censorship

This post is a brief overview of my master's thesis.

In June 2011, as heat and hardship both beat down on Britain, progressive activists proposed a general strike to protest austerity measures. They created a website at J30Strike.org, posted information about the strike, and launched a publicity campaign through social media, focusing especially on sharing links through Facebook.

It’s easy to understand why. Facebook’s News Feed does more than just capture and redistribute eyeballs: like the front page of a major newspaper, it also articulates an agenda, assembling a summary digest of important events. “As more and more is shared,” wrote engineer Peter Deng after Facebook repositioned the News Feed in the user’s home page, “we want you to be able to find out everything that is going on in the world around you.” It's a vision of social media as a kind of map, as an atlas informing users of worthwhile destinations and providing routes, in the form of links, through which they may be reached.

Participatory Aid at the MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference

We're here at the 2013 MIT-Knight Civic Media conference here at the MIT Media Lab, where the theme is Insiders/Outsiders. Across the next two days, we're going to be looking at this theme of institutions and innovators across the areas of government, media, and disaster response. Across the event, speakers will be asking if it's better to look for change inside institutions or try to transform things from the outside.

This session, on Participatory Aid, discusses how disaster aid has gone peer-to-peer. People are organizing over the internet to respond to crises in new ways. In the face of increasingly deadly disasters, how do we integrate creative public responses with formal institutions to create a more holistic aid system?

Liveblogging ODR 2013: Student Panel

Today and tomorrow I'll be liveblogging from the 2013 Online Dispute Resolution Conference in Montreal. As with all liveblogs, this is a best-efforts summary of the panel; all insights are the panelists, and any errors are my own.

We begin Tuesday morning with a Student Panel, moderated by Jeff Aresty, featuring Cléa Iavarone-Turcotte, Rotem Medzini and Riikka Koulu.

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Cléa is a research assistant here at the Cyberjustice Lab. She is presenting findings from her master's thesis investigating whether ODR increases consumer access to justice in Quebec. Like many here at the conference, she accepts the premise that ODR is helpful for consumers, and has shifted the focus of her study to modes of delivery.

Liveblogging ODR 2013: ODR Beyond e-Commerce

Today and tomorrow I'll be liveblogging from the 2013 Online Dispute Resolution Conference in Montreal. As with all liveblogs, this is a best-efforts summary of the panel; all insights are the panelists, and any errors are my own.

The next panel is Beyond eCommerce, moderated by Jeff Aresty, featuring Marie-Claude Asselin, Graham Ross, and Colin Rule.

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My friend Colin Rule leads off the panel with a talk titled "Workflow Process Management: The Next Frontier for ODR." Colin was formerly the director of eBay and PayPal's ODR system for nearly a decade, and now is the CEO and cofounder of Modria, a software-as-a-service platform for dispute resolution.

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