natematias

Recent blog posts by natematias

Making Data Useful: Projects from the Microsoft Design Summit 2013

We live in a world alive with sensors and data. The big data, sensor networks and transparency movements have left us with a supply-side glut of potential useful free data that is lying fallow. How can we use this to improve life, local community and the world at large? Today, the Microsoft Design Expo, part of the annual Faculty Summit, showcased projects along this theme from design students at 8 universities.

Christian Hackathons? 14 app ideas from Code For The Kingdom

Is there such a thing as Christian hacking? The organisers of Code for the Kingdom, a 48 hour hack day with cash prizes, certainly believe so.

Last month, almost 150 people gathered in San Francisco for Code for the Kingdom, a hackathon that gave away $11,000 in prizes to teams developing Christian projects. The event also offered networking opportunities with Christian organisations and a team of 15 mentors that included VCs, religious leaders, and senior employees at major American tech companies. Projects focused on social organising, fundraising, social reading, quantified self, content filtering, and open data.

13 Latest Projects at the MIT Center for Civic Media

One of the most energetic sessions at the MIT Knight Civic Media Conference last week was the Civic Media Ignite, which presented thirteen projects by MIT teams and our partners.

(this session was reported with NewsPad, experimental software I'm building for collaborative live-editing of articles. Participation is currently anonymous. The quality in this post may vary.)

Mapping the News (Catherine D'Ignazio)

Ethan Zuckerman presented this session for Catherine, since she just gave birth.

What does media pay attention to? Mapping The News visualizes the connection between the geography of events paid attention to, and the geography of those paying attention. In this visualization of news coverage, we see that Boston Globe focuses on places that are a bit more privileged. Mapping the Globe also shows word clouds based on location, illustrating the differences of coverage received by a place, whether it's sports, business or violence.

Unflattening: Thinking Through Comics, Nick Sousanis at Microsoft Research

I'm here at Microsoft Research in Seattle for the summer. Today, we had a visit from Nick Sousanis, who was opening an exhibition of his work. Nick is writing his dissertation (on visual and verbal discourse) entirely in graphic novel form. His project has recently been featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education (http://chronicle.com/article/article-content/131393/).

Before coming to NYC, he was immersed in Detroit’s thriving arts community, where he co-founded the arts and cultural web-mag http://www.thedetroiter.com; served as the founding director of the University of Michigan’s Work:Detroit exhibition space, and became the biographer of legendary Detroit artist Charles McGee.

Testing WeDo for nominating and voting on books at #1book140

Over the last two days, 1book140, The Atlantic's Twitter book club, has been trying out the WeDo system to test a possible way for us to choose books. WeDo is an experimental Twitter nominations and voting system by @hqz, @andresmh, and other researchers at MIT and Microsoft Research. I wanted to learn more about how it worked -- BEFORE we actually relied on it for a vote. :-)

1book140

The vote was held at: http://wedo.csail.mit.edu/publicmissions/4

To bookies, Thank you SO MUCH for trying it out with me -- our test revealed some glitches and some needs before we would ever use it for our real votes. Tomorrow, I'll post nominations on The Atlantic in the usual way (and include all of the tweets from today in the list).

I'm also planning to ask further about what other people think about trying out new ways to vote.

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