literacy

Literacy - both the basic ability to read and write and the ability to do so with critical and discerning attention - is at the heart of modern society. Members of local communities and citizens of a political entity need to be able to understand the issues facing their communities. Further, media literacy, the ability to understand media and advertising bias and hype are essential to making wise decisions.
See also <a href="/topics/education">education</a> and <a href="/topics/media">media.</a>

What We Watch

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Active

A new tool for watching how popular videos spread online.

Media Cloud

Media Cloud is a platform for studying media ecosystems—the relationships between professional and citizen media, between online and offline sources.

Trip Report: Connecting with Belo Horizonte, Brazil

I just returned from a fascinating week in Belo Horizonte (Brazil)!  The trip was organized by the Office of Strategic Priorities (@escritorio_gov) of the State of Minas Gerais (they are members of the MIT Media Lab).  The Escritorio joined the Media Lab to think harder about fostering innovation and empowering their citizens.  Following those themes, we worked together and planned an agenda that focused on four main activities:

Will it happen? A makerspace for the homeless

During my last trip to San Francisco, I heard about Marc Roth’s unconventional but sensible use of assistance money when he was homeless: He bought a membership to an SF makerspace. Marc learned the ins and outs of digital fabrication, started a successful laser cutting business, and now he’s ready to pilot The Learning Shelter, a 90-day residency program for SF homeless to build marketable making skills.

I’m enthralled. I’ve been exploring the future of work at MIT. This has looked mostly like peer economy research, but I have also been thinking about how other workforce development models may not fit today’s circumstances. Cities have traditionally approached workforce development from one of two perspectives:

[Peer economy] Why the peer economy comes off as "share-washing"

Pay attention to Tom Slee; he's snide, but he's spot-on. In a recent blog post, he neatly sums up how peer economy proponents appear to advocate selectively for its place in the formal economy.

Terminology 101 - A glossary for the sharing economy

No pun intended: I want to share something with you! I've been collecting terms around the peer economy. Stripped down to its core, this work paradigm is essentially about freelancing. It's 1099s, independent contractors and sole proprietors.

Collaborative, sharing, peer, consumption, economy... Those are enough terms to make heads spin. But I put this to you: These are not interchangeable terms. Read on, because I'm going to make my argument in the form of this fledgling glossary.


Image by MarcoD

Among platforms, analysts and consultants:

Science + Crowdfunding: match or no match?

Atray is a medical researcher. I’m a journalist by training with a bent for community. We each have roots in different strands of critical analysis. As roommates, we spent hours discussing science, cultural context and how to measure impact. One topic we often returned to is whether science can fit into a crowdfunding model.


Photo
by Scott Beale

Here’s a glimpse into our conversations, remotely stitched together this summer between Houston, Texas and Brooklyn, New York.

Denise Cheng

Atray Dixit -
A Scientist’s Perspective: The Poor Scientists Cap or New Media’s Funding Magnet?

Operations v. Capital

Mural-ing Our Way to Data Literacy

Last Tuesday Groundwork Somerville officially dedicated their South Street Farm and with it, the exciting new data mural that the Green Team has worked so hard to finish painting.

Activities for Building Visual Literacy

There are a lot of people talking about "Visual Literacy" right now. Shazna Nessa shared some thoughts from a journalistic point of view on the Mozilla Source blog recently. Her discussion focused on how data visualizers should consider the limitations and affordances of visual depictions of information. I'd like to offer a complementary response from a constructionist's point of view. Certainly the journalists and new explainers need to understand how to best use the tools at hand, but in addition we can help the "audience" build visual literacy by helping them create their own visual presentations of their information. The creative act of telling an information-based story offers everyone the best way to understand the affordances of various visualization tools, in addition to making them more aware consumers of this new "visual grammar". So how do you do this? What kind of fun activities can we do with people help them work with and present information?

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