Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Seemless anonymous contribution tracking

We just rolled out a pretty neat feature: anonymous users can now rate, evaluate and write reviews in the Do Good Quick part of our site. Their contributions are only saved when they login or register. Screen shot below:

New and veteran users can start working immediately, while still preserving the accountability of contributed information. Everyone [...]

The Long March Online--Huma Yusuf in Pakistan

Ed. note: Our research affiliate Huma Yusuf is in Karachi covering the political protests in Pakistan, and she is blogging about Pakistanis' uses of citizen journalism on The Dawn Blog, from which we'll quote as Huma posts more.

Pakistan, a developing nation with 17 million internet users in a population of over 150 million people, seems like an unlikely place for internet activism to thrive. But ongoing political turmoil (and a propensity for arbitrary arrests) has made this South Asian country one of the most politically active nations online.

Creative Destruction in the Newspaper Business

The newspaper business---not that people around here look to hasten its demise---has folks that want to rip apart the model and reassemble it. "Don’t Mourn the Passing of Business Models" is a brief post from a Cato blog that says, bluntly, "The news business as we know it today is just a historical contingency and in no way essential to democracy or an informed society." (I love libertarian writers. In a jungle, they'd be the ones poking tigers.)

We have more media options than ever, except that less and less do they include print newspapers. So what to do with those media options?

What opportunities does a newspaperless future afford?

For those who take seriously the idea of creative destruction---that innovators destroy business structures in order to create something better---how do you envision reassembling the essential parts of a dismantled newspaper business? What would you do with the writers and editors? The foreign offices? The databases and sources?

Can African-Americans Find Their Voice in Cyberspace?: A Conversation With Dayna Cunningham (Part Four of Four)

Henry Jenkins: I do think that the concept of networked publics has a great deal to offer us in terms of identifying a way of addressing some of the concerns you raise here, but I also think you need to go into that realm with your eyes wide open. So much has been written about the democratic potential of an era of social networks and collective intelligence, yet the challenge you pose here is one which might push our current understanding of this potential to the breaking point. Anna Everett's Digital Diaspora: A Race For Cyberspace (2009) gives us a number of case studies of minority activists and community leaders who have deployed digital tools as a means of promoting social change and racial justice.

Can African-Americans Find Their Voice in Cyberspace?: A Conversation With Dayna Cunningham (Part Four of Four)

Henry Jenkins: I do think that the concept of networked publics has a great deal to offer us in terms of identifying a way of addressing some of the concerns you raise here, but I also think you need to go into that realm with your eyes wide open. So much has been written about the democratic potential of an era of social networks and collective intelligence, yet the challenge you pose here is one which might push our current understanding of this potential to the breaking point. Anna Everett's Digital Diaspora: A Race For Cyberspace (2009) gives us a number of case studies of minority activists and community leaders who have deployed digital tools as a means of promoting social change and racial justice.

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed