Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Where Citizens Gather: An Interview with The Future of Public Media Project's Jessica Clark (Part Two)

Today, we continue our discussion with Jessica Clark, co-author of Public Media 2.0, an important white paper recently issued by American University's Center for Social Media.

What does your research suggest about the relative roles of professional media producers and Pro-Am media makers in the new ecology of public media?

Professionally produced content is central to public media 2.0--right now, more people than ever are consuming and linking to newspapers and broadcast news sources. Some forms of public media are expensive to produce and difficult to make using only volunteer energy and resources: investigative journalism, long-form documentary, international coverage. Those should continue to be subsidized by taxpayers, by new business models for news, and by social entrepreneurs interested in supporting "double bottom line" projects.

Where Citizens Gather: An Interview with The Future of Public Media Project's Jessica Clark (Part One)

Amidst all of the dire talk these days about the fate of the American newspaper, the Center for Social Media at American University has issued an important white paper exploring the future of public media more generally. When most of us think about "public media" these days, we are most likely to be talking about Public Broadcasting, where the Public refers as much to Public Funding as it refers to any conception of the Public Sphere. The report, Public Media 2.0, embraces the affordances and practices of an era of participatory culture and social networks to identify strategies for public media which emphasize its capacity to attract and mobilize publics. This reframing of the issues shows ways that we can expand who produces and who consumes public media, taking advantage of new stakeholders -- independent media producers, engaged online communities -- who have not always felt well served by the increasingly conservative fair on offer from public broadcasting.

Where Citizens Gather: An Interview with The Future of Public Media Project's Jessica Clark (Part One)

Amidst all of the dire talk these days about the fate of the American newspaper, the Center for Social Media at American University has issued an important white paper exploring the future of public media more generally. When most of us think about "public media" these days, we are most likely to be talking about Public Broadcasting, where the Public refers as much to Public Funding as it refers to any conception of the Public Sphere. The report, Public Media 2.0, embraces the affordances and practices of an era of participatory culture and social networks to identify strategies for public media which emphasize its capacity to attract and mobilize publics. This reframing of the issues shows ways that we can expand who produces and who consumes public media, taking advantage of new stakeholders -- independent media producers, engaged online communities -- who have not always felt well served by the increasingly conservative fair on offer from public broadcasting.

Level up animations!

This is my favorite feature yet: leveling up animations! As users express their opinions via Quick Rate and other Do Good Quick areas of bilumi.org, Munin drops pebbles into a water bottle. Contributors can watch the water level rise with every pebble until they reach the next level… and Munin takes a drink!
It’s a neat [...]

Seemless anonymous contribution tracking

We just rolled out a pretty neat feature: anonymous users can now rate, evaluate and write reviews in the Do Good Quick part of our site. Their contributions are only saved when they login or register. Screen shot below:

New and veteran users can start working immediately, while still preserving the accountability of contributed information. Everyone [...]

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