Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Audio: "New Media, Civic Media" from the sixth Media in Transition conference

MiT6 Plenary 2 | Panel Questions
Panelists:
Jessica Clark, Center for Social Media (American University)
Ellen Hume, Center for Future Civic Media (MIT)
Persephone Miel, Media Re:public and Internews Network
Respondents: Dean Jansen, Participatory Culture Foundation
Jake Shapiro, Public Radio Exchange (PRX)
Moderator: Pat Aufderheide, American University

Audio: "New Media, Civic Media" from the sixth Media in Transition conference

MiT6 Plenary 2 | Panel Questions
Panelists:
Jessica Clark, Center for Social Media (American University)
Ellen Hume, Center for Future Civic Media (MIT)
Persephone Miel, Media Re:public and Internews Network
Respondents: Dean Jansen, Participatory Culture Foundation
Jake Shapiro, Public Radio Exchange (PRX)
Moderator: Pat Aufderheide, American University

Subversive Tech & Burma's Struggle for Democracy

Recently, I have been working in partnership with the founders of Digital Democracy to plan an upcoming media literacy project with recently arrived Burmese refugee youth and their American classmates in two high schools in Indiana. The folks at Digital Democracy are also taking part in a talk next week which I thought I would repost here, since the discussion will be streamed live online:

In Burma/Myanmar, the military junta has ruled since 1962, brutally suppressing human rights and the flow of information. Yet in the fall of 2007, the military found itself challenged by Buddhist clergy and ordinary citizens who used nonviolent actions and 21st century technology to challenge the regime. Although the so-called Saffron Revolution failed to result in regime change, dedicated Burmese activists are continuing to risk their lives to work for change in their country. In a country of 58 million with less than 1% internet and cell phone penetration, how is technology being used to challenge a military regime?

Join us for an evening conversation on this topic, including:

Times articles on new economic models for newspapers

Three journalists, publicly, have been proposing new models for newspapers' financial survival in the face of Google's aggregating all web-based articles:

The Media Equation (David Carr)
Dinosaur at the Gate (Maureen Dowd)
How Newspapers Can Survive in the Internet Age (David Denby)

The tone in each is unmistakably defensive, but need it be? While I understand the fear in newsrooms, none of the three pieces acknowledges the fact that Google News has driven more traffic to the New York Times website than it would otherwise have, and only one of the three intelligently discusses Google's legal fair use---the fact that Google, with the exception of AP articles that it has licensed, only uses snippets of scraped articles and directs readers to the source for the full thing.

Video: The Future of Radio with Bill Siemering, Sue Schardt, and Henry Holtzman

How is radio evolving in the new media landscape, and where and why is it important? What are some of the innovations that are reshaping radio programming and usage? What were the best projects to win grants under the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s $400,000 call for innovative public radio production?

View this C4FCM Lecture Series event on the Future of Radio, with Bill Siemering, the creator of All Things Considered on NPR; Sue Schardt, Association of Independents in Radio; Henry Holzman of the Media Lab; and other radio luminaries.

Be sure to add more Center for Future Civic Media events to your calendar.

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