Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Recent news from the Center for Civic Media

Neighborhood Media Centers

Our friend Thomas Lowenhaupt of Connecting.nyc Inc. writes:

With the arrival of the .nyc TLD (like .com and .org but just for New York City), we'll will soon have the capacity to create neighborhood media centers such as astoria.nyc, brooklyn-heights.nyc, clinton.nyc, greenwich-village, harlem.nyc, etc.

Come hear about this new development that promises to strengthen city neighborhoods. Join us in imagining ways these sites can help neighbors locate and talk to one another about the problems and opportunities that affect them. Help decide who will operate them, the sites' content requirements and collaboration tools, and the appropriate oversight and accountability.

The event is sponsored by Connecting.nyc Inc., the NYS not-for-profit created to guide the .nyc TLD's acquisition and development.

For more, see our Traditional Neighborhood Names wiki page.

The Future of News for College Journalism: A Few Questions

Recently over at Populous we've been grappling with a few huge questions--none of them are new but they have interesting facets when put in the context of a college (or community) newspaper:

1) What is the exact relationship between user generated content and news gathered by a newsroom?

In larger-scale newspapers, there are comments, large maps and photo uploads. We, at the Daily Bruin, where we'll be testing our software, have a readership that can interact with the content on a local level (notwithstanding the epic amounts of sports fans and alums/parents visiting the site from around the country and globe) so rather than a spread out community, our readers generally live next to each other in dorms and congregate in large auditoriums and stadiums--what does this mean for the way they will develop online content and read hyperlocal news?

2) What are new revenue models for news or old ones that can be reconfigured online?

Video: C4FCM Lecture Series: The Future of Investigative Journalism, with Rich Tofel of ProPublica

How this experiment in non-profit investigative journalism is working, and whether it signals a new model for news. Funded by a rich couple from California, ProPublica aims to replace the investigative heft that is leaving the media landscape as newspapers depart.

Funded by the Sandler Foundation, the MacArthur Foundaction, and others, ProPublica aims to replace the investigative heft that is leaving the media landscape as newspapers depart.

Richard Tofel is general manager of ProPublica, with responsibility for all of its non-journalism operations, including communications, legal, finance and budgeting and human resources. He was formerly the assistant publisher of The Wall Street Journal and, earlier, an assistant managing editor of the paper, vice president, corporate communications for Dow Jones & Company, and an assistant general counsel of Dow Jones. Most recently, he served as vice president, general counsel and secretary of The Rockefeller Foundation, and earlier as president and chief operating officer of The International Freedom Center, a museum and cultural center that was planned for the World Trade Center site.

Video: C4FCM Lecture Series: The Future of Investigative Journalism, with Rich Tofel of ProPublica

How this experiment in non-profit investigative journalism is working, and whether it signals a new model for news. Funded by a rich couple from California, ProPublica aims to replace the investigative heft that is leaving the media landscape as newspapers depart.

Video: C4FCM Lecture Series: Sam Gregory of Witness

Witness uses DIY video and online technologies to open the eyes of the world to human rights violations.

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