Rogelio Alejandro Lopez's blog

Remixing Videos for Social Commentary with Media Breaker

Blog Contributors: Erhardt Graeff and Rogelio Alejandro Lopez. 

Today’s Civic Lunch speaker was D.C. Vito from the New York City based Learning About Media Project aka The LAMP. Vito is a returned Peace Corps volunteer and works with media, specifically with video. The lunch talk centered around LAMP’s new video remix tool called Media Breaker, which is ultimately intended for encouraging social commentary, parody, and critique through media creation. Along with covering Media Breaker, the talk also touched on questions of fair use, copyright, and how legal systems affect online media creation.

Media Breaker

D.C. Vito mentions that the goal of his team is to create 10,000 little Jon Stewart’s around the country, which means people actually engaging with and being critical about Mass Media.

Mozilla Maker Party

Mozilla Maker Party

by Willow Brugh and Rogelio Alejandro Lopez

Cambridge Event: https://webmaker.org/events/328

Video Activism, Free Software, and Human Rights in the Asia-Pacific Region

Video Activism, Free Software, and Human Rights in the Asia-Pacific region.

During this week's class session on Introduction to Civic Media, we invited two guest speakers: Andrew Lowenthal (Co-Founder and Director of Engaged Media) and Professor Fox Harrell (CMS/CSAIL at MIT). The course bagan with Andrew talking about his work with Engaged Media. In addition to our format, we were able to livestream the class using ustream, and welcomed users at large by tweeting the ustream link. The specific reading materials that accompanied this week's course on Video Activism, Free Software, and Human Rights in the Asia-Pacific region were:

What would W.E.B. Du Bois say about Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies?

Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies: Theories, Evidence, and Strategy

Co-authored by Denise Cheng and Rogelio Alejandro Lopez

Dr. Ernest J. Wilson III, Walter Annenberg Chair in Communication and Dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California.

This will be part 2 of the 3 part series on Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies: Theories, Evidence, and Strategy, that is hosted by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University. The lecture series infers what Du Bois might say about the impact of the digital revolution on communities of color if he were alive today. Today's talk is titled Policy Responses to Digital Inequality: Beyond Economics, for Wednesday November 28, 2012.

Dr. Ernest J. Wilson on Digital Societies and Those at the Bottom

 

What the Transition to a Digital Society Means for Those at the Bottom

Earlier today the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University hosted Dr. Ernest J. Wilson III to give a lecture as part of the Exclusion and Inequality in Digital Societies: Theories, Evidence, and Strategy series.  The lecture was titled "What the Transition to a Digital Society Means for Those at the Bottom" and began at 4:00pm. 

Intro to Civic Media: Immigration Coverage with PageOneX

 

For my final project for Introduction to Civic Media with Professor Sasha Costanza-Chock, I have been working with the platform PageOneX in order to conduct a front page analysis of immigration coverage in major newspapers.

Vojo and Tracking the Election with Cambridge Community Television

Yesterday, Denise, Royal, and I conducted an introductory Vojo workshop with youth at Cambridge Community Television (CCTV). Denise Cheng is a CMS Graduate Student and a Researcher at Center for Civic Media, and Royal Morris is an MIT undergraduate working with Vojo through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). We all met in Central Square in Cambridge to train CCTV youth how to use Vojo so that it could be used today to interview voters about their election choices. CCTV is “a nationally recognized community media center that is the voice and vision of all residents, businesses, and organizations in the city” (more info here). Upon arrival at the CCTV headquarters located in Cambridge, Denise, Royal, and I were greeted by Neha Agrawal, CCTV’s Youth Media Coordinator, who introduced us to a cohort of high school students who will be interviewing voters using Vojo during today’s presidential election.

Intro to Civic Media: Front Page Analysis of Immigrants’ Rights Movements and Farm Worker Movements

Front Page Analysis of Immigrants’ Rights Movements and Farm Worker Movements

This blog will cover my final project for the Introduction to Civic Media course, which will consist of a front-page analysis of notable events and occurrences in contemporary immigrants’ rights movements and the farmworker movement from the 1960s. My particular front page analysis will look at the front page of several newspapers in order to determine the amount of coverage that is given to a particular event or topic. In essence, this front page analysis operates under the premise that the front page of a newspaper as a space is reserved for issues deemed most pressing and important. Following this logic, the amount of physical space allocated to news stories signals their significance, with more space given to more important stories. Regardless of the size of a story that appears on the front page of a newspaper, appearing on the front page at all signals a certain level of significance to those stories. I intend to examine the front pages of major newspapers in order to identify how major newspapers present coverage relating to social movements.

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